Tuesday, January 17, 2012

TI-36X PRO: Programming Bug Info (VIDEO)



ti36x pro programming bug
In a previous post (link), I explained why the TI-36X PRO is a great calculator is you are taking the Fundamentals of Engineering or PE Exam. But it has one problem: a programming bug. Essentially, the bug is a display problem which only occurs when you try to display a mixed fraction involving pi, but still, any time your calculator is giving you wrong answers it is a serious problem.

I made a video to illustrate the bug, embedded below:


To check if your TI-36X PRO has the bug, first make sure you are in MathPrint mode. You can check this by pressing \(mode\) and scrolling down to the bottom of the list of options. Now, you need to tell the calculator to display answers in mixed fraction form. To do this, type \(1.75\) into he command line, then press \(math\) then \(1\) then enter. You should see the result \(1\frac{3}{4}\). Then type \(\pi12.5^2\) into the command line. When you hit \(enter\), you should receive the answer \(490.8738521\). Now press the answer toggle button (it is directly above \(enter\)) and your calculator will display \(154\frac{\pi}{4}\) if your calculator has the bug. The mathematically correct answer would either be \(\pi154\frac{1}{4}\) or \(\frac{\pi654}{4}\). Remember to clear the memory (hit \(on\) and \(clear\) at the same time) after you try this!

Overall, I’m still a fan of the calculator. To avoid the bug, I never try to convert anything to a mixed fraction. There are very few times where I ever need a mixed fraction anyway. You can get all the information you need in either decimal or improper fraction form. I actually used this calculator on the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam and I was very happy with it.

LINKS:
TI-36 Wikipedia Page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TI-36#Programming_Errors
The Consumerist Article: http://consumerist.com/2011/09/this-texas-instruments-calculator-cant-calculate-correctly.html
Product Guidebook from TI: http://education.ti.com/downloads/guidebooks/scientific/36xPro/TI36PRO_Guidebook_EN.pdf
Here is a video from MrTechLabs describing the same problem:

12 comments:

  1. The answer is not wrong on the calculator it is telling you 156+pi/4 still just as it did with 1.75=1+3/4. This is not a bug it is just a misconception

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    Replies
    1. No, 156+(pi/4)=156.785398... not 490.87385... which is the value we are trying to represent. The calculator's value is mathematically incorrect.

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  2. Okay, I'm a little confused. I just bought this calculator.. I did as you said to see if my calculator had the bug & the answer I got back was 156 π/4. Is this wrong? or right?

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  3. @rachel wrong indeed..the real value should be 490.8.jst think tis way,for solving (12.5^2)*pi ( 12.5^2 will be more than 144+ approximately ,which is multiplied by pi whose value is more than 3 so the real ans should be more than 450+ ie 490.8) our calculator is giving 156 pi/4=156.78..i hope ur confusion is nw cleared

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  4. The two correct answers should be pi*156-1/4 or (pi*625)/4

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  5. Oh, I get the problem. The calculator knows the number to be (156 and a fourth) of pi, but it displays 156 and pi over 4.

    Mixed fractions are dumb anyway.

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  6. I just bought my TI36. I tried π12.5^2 and i got 154π/4. Then I hit ''on'' + ''clear''. Now after the memory cleared I'm getting 625π/4. Does it mean there is no more bug?

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    Replies
    1. No. The bug is still there. You just have to refresh the bug by using math 1 at any time.

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  7. I too have gotten rid of the bug by holding down [on] and [clear] at the same time. Thanks!

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  8. "On+Clear" Seems to have cleared up the issue for me as well... Strange...

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  9. Update on the TI36x Pro Bug

    I am posting today to give everyone an update on the status of this problem. TI attempted a fix of this problem (sometime around Jan 2014) but the problem persists, but is nuanced a bit from the video, hence my post update.

    My calculator has a manufacturing code of K-0614B which means it was assembled in June of 2014, and yes, my machine has this bug also, and YES it is a bug.

    What 'triggers' the bug in the later level models of the TI36x Pro is the mixed number conversion algorithm [math] [1] [enter]. Once that happens EVEN once, the calculator will show incorrect results with PI in MathPrint. Again, clearing the memory (reseting the machine) clears the bug temporarily until the next mixed number conversion.

    One, avoid mixed number conversions combined with PI. Two, be careful to clear the calculator after mixed number conversions if PI calcs are going to be subsequently performed. Three, you might want to set your MODE to engineering, and Classic. Remember, clearing the memory also sets your MODE to defaults!

    OK, so let's see how this is nuanced on a 2014 TI36x Pro:
    Clear the memory by holding [on] and pressing [clear], then press [clear].
    Type [math] [1] [enter] (this will trigger the bug)
    0 returns 0
    Type PI 12.5 ^2 [<>] [enter]
    156 PI/4 ouch, there is our bad result
    (but now watch this, TI got half the fix right)
    Type [<>] (to toggle back to decimal)
    SYNTAX Error (whoa--- TI knows the form is bad!)

    For those of you who might still be confused by this, by definition a mixed number may not contain a transcendental number in any of its parts; by definition the parts must all be whole integers. So, having PI as a numerator component of the fractional part of the mixed number is bogus; and this is still happening on recent deliverables from TI ONCE the mixed number conversion algorithm has been tripped.

    I spoke with a rep from TI this morning and was told 'he' has never heard of it... he even asked me to walk him through the scenario, which I politely did. He told me he would report it ! ~nice, huh?

    So, you have several options:
    1) set the mode of your calculator in Classic, and Eng (three decimals) and leave it there; but, be aware that clearing the memory resets the defaults!
    2) Avoid mixed number conversions with PI
    3) Avoid mixed number conversions completely, and be careful to reset the machine if subsequent PI calcs are necessary.

    The rep at TI said they DO NOT EVER recall calculators with bad logic. They DO replace or refund within the warranty period. He told me they would prefer I return it to the store if purchased within the first 30 days of the warranty period.

    So, don't hold your breath for a fix, and never expect a recall--- having said all this, I'm not returning my calculator. It will probably be worth a lot of cash someday to calculator collectors (like me) because of this flaw--- depending on how many survive for the next thirty years! Beyond that, for the price, its still a fairly robust little machine!

    Cheers folks!

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  10. There is another bug on this calculator that I have seen many times.

    e.g. On num-solver, type in the equation 5=10+x and solve for x. Your answer will be x=-5, which is correct. Now here is the error, "when a previous num-solver gives you a negative value, like this one, it messes up your next num-solver."

    Now that you have x=-5. Repeat the process using a different equation, such as x^2=12^2+20^2. This equation is also known as the pythagorean theorem. Your answer will come out -20, even though the answer should be 20. This happens with all types of equations. That was just an example.

    Now, you're probably thinking, why not just change the "X value to 0" when solving for an equation, this will eliminate the negative value.

    WELL.....Because that also gives errors.

    For example. Try this equation 4.905x^2 = 17.68x when x=0 or even x=1. When you solve this equation, and many more!!! you get your new answer to be x=0. Which is wrong. However, if you change x to some other number like 2, you get x=3.6. Which is correct!!. This error happens when x=0 and x=1 and x=666666. And I"m sure it does it with more previous x values, I just haven't noticed it so far or even wasted my time trying to test it.

    If anyone has a solution, please post it, because I find myself avoiding the num-solver all together.

    CSUF student.

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